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Monday January 07, 2019

FDA Warns against Letting Babies Use Teething Jewelry

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in late December warned against using necklaces, bracelets and other jewelry purported to ease infants' teething discomfort. The pain-relief claims make the products medical devices so subject to FDA attention.

 

It added that other vulnerable people are "individuals with special needs, such as autism or attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), who use necklaces and bracelets to provide sensory stimulation or redirect chewing" (bit.ly/2SAdOBh).

 

The agency pointed to two incidents of strings wrapping around necks and strangling a 7-month-old and an 18-month-old. It said that other concerns involve release of small parts and irritation/infection of gums.

 

FDA also issued advice including to talk to pediatricians about alleviating teething pain or at least to look at recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics. It specifically recommended gently rubbing gums with clean fingers or using firm-rubber teething rings but not frozen.

 

It also warned against products containing benzocaine or other anesthetics due to the risk of methemoglobinemia, a condition of lowered blood oxygen.